top ten assumptions to make, going in to an IEP meeting

The author, Juliet Hiznay, is a special education advocate and attorney in private practice in Northern Virginia. For information about her practice, visit http://jdhiznay.com/ 

TEN: YOU ARE YOUR CHILD’S BEST ADVOCATE

NINE: PARENTS ARE NOT NEUTRAL . . . AND EVERYONE KNOWS IT

EIGHT: THE ENTIRE SCHOOL-BASED TEAM WANTS YOUR CHILD TO BE SUCCESSFUL AND WANTS TO DO A GOOD JOB

SEVEN: YOUR CHILD MAY NOT FUNCTION THE SAME AT SCHOOL AS THEY DO AT HOME

SIX: MOST PROBLEMS CAN BE RESOLVED THROUGH GOOD COMMUNICATION AND HARD WORK: DEVELOPING GOOD WILL, IDENTIFYING THE PROBLEM, COLLABORATING ON A SOLUTION

FIVE: EVERYONE LIKES A COMPLIMENT; NO ONE LIKES A CRITICISM

FOUR: NO SCHOOL IS PERFECT

THREE: NO IEP IS PERFECT

TWO: THERE IS ALWAYS ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT – HOW HARD DO YOU WANT TO WORK? IT IS ALL ABOUT BALANCE.

ONE: FOR MOST EVERYONE, WITH THE POSSIBLE EXCEPTION OF LITIGATORS, COLLABORATION IS MORE FUN THAN CONFRONTATION

Published August 15, 2012; All Rights Reserved Juliet D. Hiznay